Table Saw Injuries

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An estimated 6 million to 10 million people in the United States own table saws today. There is an average of 30,000 table-saw-related injuries a year that require an emergency room visit, with approximately 3,000 of them for digit amputation. Table saws are associated with more injuries than any other type of woodworking tool.

New safety technology, called SawStop, was developed about 10 years ago. This technology, through an electrical current and a computer chip, has the ability to detect skin contact with the saw blade and within 5/1000th of a second stop and drop the blade out of harm’s way. While this safety technology is readily available, certain table saw manufacturers have chosen not to adopt it. In 2003, the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) was petitioned to require SawStop on table saws. Although the CPSC has not made a ruling, they would prefer table saw manufactures to voluntarily adopt this safety technology.

In March 2010, the Boston Globe published an article citing litigation brought forth on behalf of Carlos Osorio against One World Technologies Inc., maker of Ryobi saws. The court, under the premise of failure to include flesh detection technology, awarded Osorio $1.5 million in damages as a result of a table saw injury in which the outcome was five surgeries, two permanently disfigured and unusable fingers and loss of feeling in three others. During Osorio’s trial, an expert witness for the defense acknowledged that if the saw had the flesh detection technology, it would have created a 1/8-inch deep cut on one finger.

If you or someone you love has been injured, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact us today for a free legal consultation.