Union Members & Mesothelioma

Quick Summary

Throughout the 20th century, union members, including carpenters, firefighters, and mechanics, worked with asbestos-containing tools and products on a daily basis. Asbestos exposure can lead to various diseases and cancers, putting these workers at higher risk. If you are a union tradesman and were exposed to asbestos on the job, you may be eligible for financial compensation.

Union Members & Mesothelioma

Union Members and Asbestos

A labor or trade union is made up of a community of workers dedicated to improving working conditions and protecting the group’s collective best interests. Union members work together to make their job site safer, happier, and more productive.

However, a union cannot always protect workers from one of the biggest dangers they may face on the job: asbestos.

Asbestos exposure is the only known cause of mesothelioma, a deadly form of cancer. This year, thousands of Americans will receive a mesothelioma diagnosis. As a union worker, you and your family have a higher risk of asbestos exposure — and, therefore, developing mesothelioma.

The Truth about Asbestos

During the 20th century, asbestos was widely used across many trades and throughout the military. Asbestos is an indestructible mineral that was once praised for its resistance to fire, heat, and electricity. However, it has a proven link to multiple types of cancer and other diseases.

Did You Know?

The sad truth is that companies knew about the health risks and dangers of asbestos exposure, but they chose not to warn their workers.

After a latency period of 20-50 years, union workers are now developing mesothelioma or other asbestos-related diseases. Their family members are also at risk due to secondhand asbestos exposure.

Some men and women think that if they become sick, they do not have any medical or legal options. Luckily, this is not true.

Sokolove Law represents union members and their families throughout the United States. We have over 40 years of experience handling mesothelioma cases and would be proud to serve you, too.

Union Members at Risk of Asbestos Exposure

Unfortunately, asbestos was used in thousands of products at job sites across the United States. This means that the union workers who used these products every day came into constant contact with this deadly material.

Union members at increased risk include:

Workers who used asbestos-containing tools and products naturally have a higher risk of developing an asbestos-related disease like mesothelioma. What many do not realize is that these workers put their coworkers and families at risk, too.

For example, asbestos products were often used on construction sites. If a mechanic removed a product such as a hood liner made with asbestos, they may have inadvertently exposed their coworkers — even those who performed different jobs on the site, such as contractors.

Further, families of union members often faced secondhand exposure to asbestos. When workers would come home after a long day on the job, asbestos fibers on their skin, clothes, or tools could be released into the air and inhaled or ingested by loved ones at their house.

Are Union Members at Risk Now?

Many American workers have been led to believe that asbestos is no longer a threat. However, this may not always be the case.

Many union workers today are tasked with doing renovation or construction on older buildings. Before the 1980s, asbestos was common in building materials such as pipes, drywall, and insulation.

When work is done on these buildings — especially demolition — it may stir up hidden asbestos fibers, and workers can then breathe them in.

What Can You Do?

Asbestos-related cancer is a unique medical and legal matter. If you have worked with or around asbestos in the past, be upfront with your doctor about your exposure history. This is especially true if you are displaying any of the common symptoms of mesothelioma or another asbestos-related disease.

See your doctor if you display the following symptoms:

  • Persistent cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • Unexplained weight loss

Sokolove Law Helps Union Tradesmen with Mesothelioma

Dealing with a mesothelioma diagnosis can be devastating. Hiring a mesothelioma lawyer is a critical step in the process. A legal claim can help you secure financial compensation for you and your family.

Sokolove Law is a law firm with over 40 years of experience in handling mesothelioma legal claims. Working within this area of the law is our specialty.

Top Reasons to Choose Sokolove Law

  • Experience: We have represented hundreds of skilled union tradesmen throughout the country. This includes auto workers and firefighters. Our legal team has a proven track record of helping families affected by asbestos. By working with us, these families have recovered over $4.4 Billion.
  • Location: Sokolove Law, headquartered in Chestnut Hill, MA, has a nationwide practice. We have law offices in nearly every state. No matter where you live, we will come to you — so you can focus on your health and your family.
  • Reputation: We work with leading medical experts throughout the country. The firm has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). We have been positively peer-reviewed by prestigious companies like Martindale Hubbell.

Sokolove Law Can Help You

Union tradesmen help keep the nation up and running. As someone who plays such a critical role in our society, you do not deserve to face your diagnosis of an asbestos-related illness alone.

If you are sick, put the resources and experience of Sokolove Law on your side. We have seen the effects of asbestos-related diseases firsthand. That is why we will give you and your family the respect and personal attention you deserve.

Call us today at (800) 647-3434 or fill out our form to learn how we can help you.

Author:Sokolove Law

The Sokolove Law Content Team is made up of writers, editors, and journalists. We work with case managers and mesothelioma attorneys to keep site information up to date and accurate. Our site has a wealth of resources available for victims of mesothelioma and their families.

Last modified: October 28, 2019